Tag Archives: Plans

Electrical Rough In!

After completing the siding, I took a bit of a building hiatus for the holidays.  Today we started roughing in the electrical.  It’s an easy enough sentence to write, it was far more challenging to get ready to rough in the electrical.  Because I have changed the interior layout of my tiny house from the plans I bought, I had to plan out my electrical.   In September, I started talking to an electrician who offered to help me design my electrical system, unfortunately, he had to back out in early November.  Designing the electrical system fell to the wayside and it wasn’t until the siding was completed that the electrical had to be tackled.  Problem was, I didn’t know how to tackle it.

Switch layoutA friend, who is a retired engineer and came to the rescue.  With his help, I was able to hash out a layout for my electrical system,I sent it to an electrician to double-check it, yesterday I went shopping for the AC components in the system, and today, we started roughing it in.

It was great to get back to the build.  It took 2 space heaters to get the tiny house warm enough to work without gloves on.  We started by marking out the locations of all the outlets and boxes.  We stapled vapour barriers in place, installed the boxes and then holes were drilled for the wires to run through.   The wire was run one circuit at a time, leaving enough slack for the wire to be put into each box later on. I colour coded each circuit so that when the electrical panel is put in later (the panel will be on an interior wall that won’t be built until after the insulation is done),  it’s easy to know which circuit is which.

We got most of the circuits put in today.  Next week, we finish the putting in the last of the circuits and install all of the bathroom fan vent, the furnace vent, the HRV units (or as soon as they arrive), the water and electrical in. Once that is done, we prepare for the spray foam to be installed, sealing up any openings to the exterior, building up the boxes around the wheel wells, and protecting the electrical outlets from the foam. I am getting a plumber to install the propane lines before the spray foam gets in.

Happy New Year everyone!

Vapour barrier going in.
Vapour barrier going in.
My first attempt at putting in an electrical box.
My first attempt at putting in an electrical box.

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My Stairs!  They are made from the lumber removed from the trailer.
My Stairs! They are made from the lumber removed from the trailer.
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Cutbacks and Getting Ready for a Roof

During this past week, I was puttering around my sheathed tiny house when realized that I had not measured the width of my tiny house.  When the ridge beam was put in place, the height of the trailer was discussed – because the plans I bought clearly state that the house be built for the legal road height of 13’6″ (or 4.15m).  What it isn’t as clear obvious about is the width of the house.  The width of the house is there, but there is no obvious statement such as “make sure your house is no wider than 8’6″ (or 2.6m)“.  So I measured the width of my tiny house and it was 8’10” wide.  I have not done much research into building my house wider than 8’6″ because I have no desire to have to get a wide load permit, or move my house with a vehicle larger than a heavy-duty pick up truck as that would be a little more complicated than renting a pick up from a car rental company.   All this to say, we had to make some cut backs this weekend.  All of the rafters had to be cut back.

Hanging out on the roof, removing the fascia.
Hanging out on the roof, removing the fascia.

The rafters for the dormers already had the fascia installed, so that had to be removed and reinstalled.  I am very glad I didn’t have to figure out the math of how much had to be cut off each rafter as they are on an angle, and generally that kind of math makes my brain hurt.   Stefan made templates for me to mark off each of the rafters the appropriate amount.  He used a reciprocating to cut each rafter.  There was an experiment with a chainsaw, to see if it was the better tool.  The chainsaw was quickly abandoned, as it was faster, but not as friendly to the sheathing as the reciprocating saw.

After the rafters were cut,  the fascia was reinstalled and then a section was added to tie the 12/12 sections of the roof together as per the plans (12/12 sections are the sections of roof that are steeper than the dormers).  At the same time, we insulated and house wrapped most of the dormers.

This weekend was reduced to one day of building due to some fairly solid rain on Saturday.   Sunday was a beautiful clear and bright day.  It was also cold.  When we started in the morning, the ground was frozen.  I was showered with small pieces of  ice as the tarp was removed. Winter is around the corner.

Next week:  Windows and Doors! (weather permitting)

2nd Build Weekend

The second weekend of building with Stefan was really good.   We had hoped that my ridge been would be here so that we could start working on the rafters, but the sawmill was unable to deliver my 22′ 4×6 ridge beam.   Plans were changed – instead of rafters, we set out to finish the 4th wall of the house and the 4 walls ready for siding.  I ordered 4’x8′ sheets of 1″  extruded polystyrene insulation to put around the house to help increase the Rvalue of my walls.  Code in Québec calls for R25 in walls – in order to get that kind of Rvalue in my walls and keep as much interior space as possible, the exterior walls have to be insulated as well.

Before we insulated, we finished the 4th wall of the house which was different from the first three for several reasons.  I have chosen to almost create a bay window in that end wall of the house.  Doing so creates some interesting challenges in a tiny home.  The plans for the house call for parallam posts and beams in that wall along with a threaded rod  under the window and strapping around the edges.  I could not find the exact posts and beams required and ended up with slightly smaller posts (1/4″ smaller on one side) and beams that were almost 2″ wider.  Parallam is an engineered wood, quite beautiful to look at.  It is also heavy.   The wall went together pretty quickly and then we built the loft framing.

I am in the background ratcheting one of 6 8" lagbolts into the parallam beam to attach it to the subfloor.  That beam is not going anywhere.
I am in the background ratcheting one of 6 8″ lag bolts into the parallam beam to attach it to the subfloor. That beam is not going anywhere.
Stefan is measuring, I am daintily  ratcheting a lag bolt.
Stefan is measuring, I am daintily ratcheting a lag bolt.
The threaded rod that goes through the wall.
The threaded rod that goes through the wall.
Isn't the parallam pretty?
Isn’t the parallam pretty?
One end wall mostly sheathed.
One end wall mostly sheathed.
The view from what will be the kitchen
The view from what will be the kitchen.
The view from the bay window into the rest of the house.
The view from the bay window into the rest of the house.

By the end of Saturday, we had the 4 walls built and sheathed.  Sunday we only did a half day, we put up the insulation, wrapped the house with house wrap and then put up strapping until the nail gun ran out of nails.   Not bad for a day and a half.

I am generally not a morning person and yet here I am smiling early on a Sunday morning!
I am generally not a morning person and yet here I am smiling early on a Sunday morning!
The large loft is in place.  I chose to go with cedar 4"x4" for the collar ties for both lofts.  The plans called for my flooring to go directly on the collar ties, but Stefan suggested that we go with 5/8" plywood first and the put the flooring over top.  I am very pleased with that decision as that plywood has taken a beating.
The large loft is in place. I chose to go with cedar 4″x4″ for the collar ties for both lofts. The plans called for my flooring to go directly on the collar ties, but Stefan suggested that we go with 5/8″ plywood first and the put the flooring over top. I am very pleased with that decision as that plywood has taken a beating. For those who are interested, I am cutting the window out of the insulation.

My house all pretty in pink!
My house all pretty in pink!
Wrapping the house. Stefan used roofing nails to keep the house wrap in place.
Wrapping the house. Stefan used roofing nails to keep the house wrap in place.
At the end of the day, I went up to the loft to repair some holes in the tarp and ended up falling alseep in my loft.
At the end of the day, I went up to the loft to repair some holes in the tarp and ended up falling asleep in my loft.
Me still asleep and stored below me are my windows which arrived Saturday morning stored safely under the loft.
Me still asleep and stored below me are my windows which arrived Saturday morning stored safely under the loft.