Tag Archives: welding

Overdue for an Update

I have started moving in!  I have been sleeping in the tiny house since my mattress was delivered at the beginning of the month.  It has been glorious to wake up in my loft, hearing the birds outside and feeling so very much at home!  The bathroom isn’t finished yet, there is no electricity and the propane hasn’t been installed yet, up until yesterday there was nothing to sit on and the floors were covered up with cardboard.

Here’s a recap of the work that has been done in the month since my last update:

The bathtub has been built!  The drain was installed, but leaked, so we had to head back to the drawing board and after some consultation and a new drain basket, fingers crossed, I will have a functional tub at the beginning of June.    Here are the tub progress pics.

The toilet bench has also been built.  The final coat of paint is drying as I type this.  The toilet bench also accommodates the winter grey water tank and the fancy grey water plumbing.  I have to attach the piano hinge for the two lids on the bench (one for the toilet and the other for the grey water compartment).  The sawdust will live in a bin that will rest on the grey water compartment.  The toilet will be ready early next week.

The kitchen counter has been installed!  I am really happy with the counter I chose and with the amount of counter there is in the tiny house.  The kitchen sink and faucet were installed and the freshwater plumbing is almost finished, with the exception of the countertop water inlet connection.  As it’s spring, I am all hooked with a potable water hose and I have running water.  The exterior grey water tank or french drain still has to be worked out, but as I am not living in the house full-time yet, it hasn’t been a problem yet.

The HRV units got their boxes, which we filled with spray foam, and then they were finished.  I am really happy with how the HRV units look and I get a bonus space above them to sneak in a knick-knack if the fancy strikes me.

Left to do (nb: this is not an ordered list)

  • Get a welder to come out and weld on the brackets for the propane tanks.
  • Get propane installed.
  • Install the stove and the furnace.
  • Finish the freshwater plumbing.
  • Install the drain and faucet on the tub.
  • Install the lids on the toilet bench.
  • Install ¼” plywood on the front edges of the rafters for the roofers.
  • Get a new roof.
  • Figure out my clothing storage.
  • Install the last of the trim in the bathroom.
  • Install the medicine cabinet in the bathroom.
  • Have a house-warming party!

A Subfloor

It’s like Christmas came early today.  I am so very happy with the work that was done today.   I am 19 1/2 inches away from a subfloor.  19 1/2 inches.  Even better, tomorrow I get to start working on my wall framing.  I head back to work Tuesday and will be building on weekends from here on in.  I am so glad I took the past 2 weeks off to start my build.

Friday morning , a welder came and welded on taller threaded rods onto my trailer.  He was fast, and charged me less than what he had quoted.  Yay!  I got rods.  The rest of the day was still spent working on flashing and we got held up by the rain.  I had hoped to be a little further along by the end of the day, but then the rain came.  We wrangled one of my uncles and a couple of my cousins to come over and help us move some of the sections of the subfloor about, which they did help us do, but we weren’t able to do as much as we hoped because of the rain.

Saturday was a day where a lot of work was done, but nothing really looked any different.  My uncle Phil and cousin Alex came back over and helped us move some of the subfloor sections as we needed some muscle.  We also put down some more Blueskin on the pressure treated wood on the trailer.  We got 2 sections in place, which with the new threaded rod was a bit of a challenge, figuring out where to drill holes and then having to re-drill holes when things didn’t line up quite as expected.  The third section was set up in place, raised up on blocks as we tried to line up the holes previously drilled and drill some new ones for the newly added rods. Throughout the process of this build, checking for square has been a regular part of the process.  With the 3rd section of the subfloor up on blocks, we checked for square and the previously square structure was completely out of alignment.  At the end of the day we had to leave the subfloor incomplete, unscrew the flashing on 2 sides of that section of subfloor and leave the section undone over night, while I went to a kegger at my brother & sister-in-law’s.  It was a much-needed evening of laughter, good food, good beer and friends.

When we were able to get to the construction this morning, we unscrewed a 3rd side of the flashing from that section, used  a series of clamps to get the subfloor square and then screwed the flashing back on and got back to getting the holes lined up for the subfloor to fit over the threaded rods.  My father was amazing as I found the process of getting everything lined up really frustrating.  He was able to get the subfloor in place.  Yay!

We started getting the insulation into the subfloor, a very quick and satisfying process of laying batts in the subfloor, when my neighbour Mike asked if he could lend a hand.  Mike was my favourite person today.  I did not realize that Mike used to build houses.  Mike also has amazing toys or tools, call them what you will, a contractor’s circular saw is a beautiful thing.  With Mike’s help we relevelled the trailer, and magically the subfloor was pretty much complete, if it hadn’t been for my purchasing one too few sheets of 3/4 plywood, the subfloor would be finished right now.  As it stands, a quick trip to the hardware store and a rummage through their off cuts and my subfloor will be done tomorrow and the process of starting the wall framing can begin.

Wet trailer with newly welded rods
Wet trailer with newly welded rods

 

The 3 sections of my subfloor leaning up against the house.  They had to be taken off the trailer so that the rods could be added to the trailer
The 3 sections of my subfloor leaning up against the house. They had to be taken off the trailer so that the rods could be added to the trailer
New rod!
New rod!
The trailer with all the rods on and one of the last times we will see all of the frame.
The trailer with all the rods on and one of the last times we will see all of the frame.
Sage supervising the build
Sage supervising the build
Clover's idea of helping with the build is to bring you a ball.  She is so very helpful.
Clover’s idea of helping with the build is to bring you a ball. She is so very helpful.
Me showing my best side!  Before covering up the trailer I used a grinder to remove some of the rusty metal shavings from the holes drilled to attach the boards to the trailer.
Me showing my best side! Before covering up the trailer I used a grinder to remove some of the rusty metal shavings from the holes drilled to attach the boards to the trailer.
After the rust was removed, my dad spray panted the now unpainted metal to protect it.
After the rust was removed, my dad spray panted the now unpainted metal to protect it.
My cousin Alex and raising the subfloor up over the rods so that the holes could be drilled for the rods to fit through.
My cousin Alex and raising the subfloor up over the rods so that the holes could be drilled for the rods to fit through.
Lining up the rods and the holes
Lining up the rods.
One section down! Now to remove some excess Blueskin
One section down! Now to remove some excess Blueskin
Drilling holes for the rods.
Drilling holes for the rods.
Jump to an insulated, re-levelled trailer and the first piece of plywood going in place.
Jump to an insulated, relevelled trailer and the first piece of plywood going in place.
Look at that subfloor!  It's beauty is only enhanced by the Iron Bridge brown ale sitting on it.  It was the last of the beer I brought back from PEI.
Look at that subfloor! It’s beauty is only enhanced by the last of the beer I brought back from PEI.

Flashing… my subfloor

My goal for these first two weeks of construction is to get the subfloor done.  For a while,  I had hoped that maybe I could get some walls up, but I think it’s going to be a completed subfloor.  I am not working as many hours every day as I had hoped, as I cannot work alone during this stage of the build.  Turning over sections of the subfloor alone just isn’t feasible.  So my schedule is restricted, nonetheless, construction is moving forward.

Today, most of the flashing is done, we had to stop working on the trailer as thunder rumbled in the distance (didn’t feel wise to work with metal when there was thunder for some reason) and I had to go and by an extra piece of the galvanized flashing I am using, as I miscalculated when I first purchased the flashing.  In the end the slow pace is working out well.  Every morning my father and I bring in a set of realizations that help us move forward.  This morning our realizations had to do with wrapping the flashing up the edges of the framing of the subfloor.  My original plan of folding the flashing over the edges of the framing didn’t work well with the flashing I ended up buying.

Most of what I have read recommends aluminum flashing for the underside of the subfloor.  The decking of my trailer and the wood I am using on the outer edges of the subfloor are pressure treated, and the chemicals used in pressure treating the wood can react with aluminum.  So I am going with galvanized flashing (I would tell you the metal that has been galvanized if I knew what kind of metal it is). The galvanized flashing that I was able to get is much thicker than the aluminum flashing and possibly also less flexible than aluminum, so wrapping it over the edges of the subfloor was far from pretty and left space for water to well in, so today all of the excess flashing was cut off.  I am also using a product by Bakor called Blueskin WP 200, to seal the seams of the flashing and I am being possibly a little extra cautious and am using it wherever the flashing comes into contact with the pressure treated wood.  Possibly overkill, on the other hand, this is a section of the house that will not be easy to go back and redo once I am further along and I want to prevent as much corrosion as I can.

Tomorrow, a welder comes to add extra threaded rods to my trailer, as the rods that are already welded onto my trailer are not long enough.  Once the new rods are welded on, we can drill new holes in the sublfoor, set the 3 sections of the subfloor onto the trailer right-side up and move onto insulating and covering the whole thing up with plywood.  Then it’s onto framing the walls and I have to decide exactly where my door will be.

Flashing my trailer.  I understand flashing usually requires less clothing, but this is a different kind of flashing with sharp edges involved.
We are getting the first piece of flashing on. The first piece should have been the last one to go on as you should start at the other end of the trailer so that when your trailer is on the road water the seams of the flashing do not encourage water to get in. So we put this piece on and started again at the other end.
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This is one view of the Blueskin all cut up and ready to edge the flashing.
IMG_0076
Making sure it’s square.